1st Dutch PowerShell User Group (DuPSUG) meeting

  • PowerShell logoFriday, November 23, 2012 the first Dutch PowerShell User group (DuPSUG) meeting will be held in Eindhoven, The Netherlands. Speakers are:
    Microsoft Scripting Guy Ed Wilson, PowerShell MVP Richard Siddaway, Bert Wolters, Stefan Stranger and Jeff Wouters.

    Session topics are:

    • Using Windows PowerShell 3.0 to manage the remote Windows 8 workstation
    • PowerShell and WMI
    • What’s new in PowerShell 3.0
    • Protect your PowerShell scripts with version control
    • From command, to script, to function, to advanced function, to tool

    More information can be found at: 1st DuPSUG meeting.

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  • PowerShell 3.0 is available for download

    PowerShell logoSince September 4th 2012 is PowerShell 3.0 available for download. PowerShell 3.0 is included in the Windows Management Framework 3.0 that contains also WMI and WinRM. It can be installed on Windows 7 SP1, Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 SP2. Windows Management Framework 3.0 requires Microsoft .NET Framework 4.0. PowerShell 3.0 is a standard component of Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012. Read more of this post

    How to list all the PowerCLI ESXCLI commands

    PowerCLI logoLast week there was a question in the VMware VMTN Communities VMware vSphere PowerCLI forum from Papires who asked how you can convert the ESXCLI command ‘esxcli storage vmfs snapshot mount -l “DATASTORE”‘ into a PowerCLI command. I had not done very much with ESXCLI in PowerCLI, but I knew that it was something like ‘$esxcli.storage.vmfs.snapshot.mount’. However I was struggling with the ‘-l “DATASTORE”‘ part.

    There is not much documentation available about the ESXCLI commands in PowerCLI. And also a search in Google did not help me very much. Finally I found the right answer using the PowerShell Get-Member cmdlet. Read more of this post

    Use Performance Monitor to get VM performance statistics

    PowerShell logoIn PowerCLI you can use the Get-Stat cmdlet to get performance statistics. But for Microsoft Windows virtual machines with the VMware Tools installed there is another way to get the statistics. Even without using PowerCLI. Read more of this post

    Use PowerCLI to find the datastore from a disk name

    PowerCLI logoRecently we get vSphere alarms in our environment that say for instance:

    “[VMware vCenter – Alarm Host error] Issue detected on host in datastore: ScsiDeviceIO: 2368: Failed write command to write-quiesced partition naa.600a0b8000111155000021c53f97784e:1 (42:01:04:07.994 cpu7:5191)”

    There seems to be a problem on a partition. But which datastore is on this partition? We can use PowerCLI to find the datastore involved. Read more of this post

    PowerShell function to get disk SCSI Lun number

    PowerShell logoFor our Boot From SAN servers we wanted to know the SCSI Lun number of the disks. You can get this information via WMI. But to retrieve it you need four different WMI objects. I made a PowerShell advanced function that combines these four WMI objects to relate the disk with the LUN number. Read more of this post

    Function to speed-up the execution of the first PowerCLI cmdlet

    PowerCLI logo
    Last year there was a post on the PowerCLI Team blog called How to speed-up the execution of the first PowerCLI cmdlet. That post showed commands you need to execute to pre-compile some of the PowerCLI code to prevent this from being done in every PowerCLI session.

    Running these commands will speed-up the execution of the first PowerCLI cmdlet you run in your session. The blog post was made before PowerCLI 5.0 was released and didn’t show the commands to speed-up PowerCLI 5.0. Later there was a post at the vNugglets blog Speed Up First PowerCLI 5 cmdlet — Precompile XMLSerializers that shows the commands needed for PowerCLI 5.0.

    But what happens when PowerCLI 5.1 or 6.0 is released? Of course we can try to find the new commands needed to speed-up PowerCLI every time a new version is released. But would it not be easier if we have a function that will do this for you?

    The Install-PowerCLIXmlSerializer function presented in this post will show you a PowerShell function that you need to run once after you install a new PowerCLI version to speed-up the execution of the first cmdlet every time you run PowerCLI. Read more of this post